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Snow covers soybean plants in Stutsman County, N.D., on Oct. 10, 2018. The storm dropped more than a foot of snow in some parts of the Dakotas and Minnesota. (Jenny Schlecht/Agweek)

Oh-so-slow area harvest drags on: Corn, soybeans, sunflowers remain in fields

With almost glacial slowness, the Upper Midwest harvest is inching forward. And even though Thanksgiving is in the rear-view mirror, many area farmers still have crops in the field.

Much of the area's corn and sunflower crops remain to be harvested, and even some soybeans haven't been combined yet, according to the weekly crop progress report released Monday, Nov. 26, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The report reflected conditions on Nov. 25.

Normally, soybean harvest has wrapped up for at least several week by late November. And, indeed, South Dakota soybean farmers have completed their harvest, according to the new report.

But North Dakota farmers have harvested only 94 percent of their soybeans, up marginally from the 93 percent a week earlier.

Minnesota farmers have harvested 99 percent of their soybeans, up slightly from 98 percent a week earlier.

The harvest pace of corn and sunflowers, which normally are combined after soybeans, continues to lag, too, especially in South Dakota and North Dakota. Here's a closer look:

Corn

Minnesota — Ninety-six percent of the crop was harvested by Nov. 25, compared with the five-year average of 98 percent for that date.

South Dakota — Ninety percent of the crop was harvested by Nov. 25, compared with the five-year average of 97 percent for that date.

North Dakota — Eighty percent of the crop was harvested by Nov. 25, compared with the five-year average of 93 percent for that date.

Sunflowers

South Dakota — Sixty-three percent of the crop was harvested by Nov. 25, compared with the five-year average of of 84 percent for that date.

North Dakota — Seventy-four percent of the crop was harvested by Nov. 25, compared with the five-year average of 83 percent for that date.

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